Is Africa genuinely tackling corruption?

Editor, Reference is made to Lonzen Rugira's article, "Is East Africa finally taking corruption seriously?" (The New Times, December 29). I believe that corruption is a common conundrum worldwide. But the uniqueness about many countries in Africa is that the vice has penetrated in every aspect of social life, starting from the head of states through the ministers, affecting the entire senior civil service, and the subordinates.

Editor,

Reference is made to Lonzen Rugira’s article, “Is East Africa finally taking corruption seriously?” (The New Times, December 29).

I believe that corruption is a common conundrum worldwide. But the uniqueness about many countries in Africa is that the vice has penetrated in every aspect of social life, starting from the head of states through the ministers, affecting the entire senior civil service, and the subordinates.

With such echelon of corruption, Africa is likely to remain poor because those who are employed to serve others serve themselves. While some leaders and individuals embezzle millions of dollars, the ordinary citizens die of malnutrition, hunger and struggle to survive in environments that deny them their humanity.

Unquestionably, with effective leadership the whole continent would be rich.

Even though partly dictatorship can be blamed, I reject the views that democracy and elections can solve Africa’s accepted culture of corruption—the evidence shows that both “undemocratic “and “democratic” states are in the same boat.

Butare

**************

Over US$120 million of public money disappear in a multitude of well-connected highly placed rat-holes. Only one person who took less than 1/120th of that money is sacked. Taking corruption seriously? I don’t think so. The question is in fact, how far up the food chain does the rot go? Are the lower level rats any more than fall guys and girls?

Mwene Kalinda

ADVERTISEMENT