Modernity does not mean abandoning our values

Editor, I am writing with a great concern and grief over the new phenomena that the Rwandan community, especially the "young generation" is embracing.

Editor,

I am writing with a great concern and grief over the new phenomena that the Rwandan community, especially the “young generation” is embracing.

As Rwanda is steadily progressing in the use of IT as time management and workload solution through establishment of 4G LTE, and soon 5G, our youth, as well as some grown-ups, are ushering in the poor eating habits. 

If we are to go by Plato’s saying, “We can easily forgive a child who is frightened of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of light”.

Indeed, we can excuse the young boys and girls for chewing their samosas, burgers and so on while crossing the zebra crossings and walking all over our beautiful streets of Kigali, though we can not excuse them for littering the used-up napkins..

But never endorse the so called claims of hurry that make people fail to spare time to service their internal faults (get rid of hunger) before embarking on their walk around Kigali City. 

What is the intrinsic value of eating while walking? What have we missed out for centuries when we used to eat in a well sheltered and closed environment? Does buying a chapatti and go about eating in the city a culture worth importing?

Two things define us: our patience when we have nothing and our attitude when we have everything. So if we are going to endorse eat-walking practice, then we shall be justifying that our attitudes are bound to change if we have what to eat, and our patience was solely based on lack of food.

I said no to eat-walking practice. Let’s preserve Rwandan morals and values that we had for centuries.

Franklin S. Amanya