Nutrition: Liver: Nature's most potent super food

Conventional dietary wisdom holds that the micronutrients (vitamins, minerals and trace elements) we need from foods are most highly concentrated in fruits and vegetables. While it's true that fresh fruits and veggies are full of vitamins and minerals, their micronutrient content doesn't always hold up to what is found in meats and organ meats - especially liver.

Conventional dietary wisdom holds that the micronutrients (vitamins, minerals and trace elements) we need from foods are most highly concentrated in fruits and vegetables. While it’s true that fresh fruits and veggies are full of vitamins and minerals, their micronutrient content doesn’t always hold up to what is found in meats and organ meats – especially liver.

Note that every nutrient in red meat except for vitamin C surpasses those in apples and carrots, and every nutrient—including vitamin C—in beef liver occurs in exceedingly higher levels in beef liver compared to apple and carrots.

In general, organ meats are between 10 and 100 times higher in nutrients than corresponding muscle meats. (That said, fruits and vegetables are rich in phytonutrients like flavonoids and polyphenols that aren’t found in high concentrations in meats and organ meats, so fresh produce should always be a significant part of your diet.)

Some people fear to eat liver because liver is known to be the storage organ for toxins in the body says Samuel Gatera, a biology teacher and father who is very cautious about his eating habits.

“While it is true that one of the liver’s role is to neutralize toxins (such as drugs, chemical agents and poisons), it does not store these toxins. Toxins the body cannot eliminate are likely to accumulate in the body’s fatty tissues and nervous systems,” he says.

He adds that in liver’s storage is many important nutrients (vitamins A, D, E, K, B12 and folic acid, and minerals such as copper and iron).

“These nutrients provide the body with some of the tools it needs to get rid of toxins,” he concludes.

It is essential to eat meat and organ meats from animals that have been raised on fresh pasture without hormones, antibiotics or commercial feed. Pasture-raised animal products are much higher in nutrients than animal products that come from commercial feedlots.

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