Let us be proud of our language

Editor, Refer to the article, "What does Kinyarwanda change mean for education?" (The New Times, November 26). Interesting read. The Rwandan Academy of Languages and Culture should bear in mind that any changes made to our language, we, Rwandans should be consulted because Kinyarwanda does not belong to a small segment of experts only.

Editor,

Refer to the article, “What does Kinyarwanda change mean for education?” (The New Times, November 26).

Interesting read. The Rwandan Academy of Languages and Culture should bear in mind that any changes made to our language, we, Rwandans should be consulted because Kinyarwanda does not belong to a small segment of experts only.

We Rwandans we are experts of our language. In many cases Kinyafranglais gains popularity because it is promoted and cherished.

I have been living abroad for many years but I often listen to Radio Rwanda online, airing Kinyafranglais (a concoction of Kinyarwanda, French and English). It has become a norm, especially in the sports programmes.

On the other hand, this mess does not happen in Swahili, French, or English services.

Moreover, Rwandans should feel proud of their language and stop using any foreign language as lingua franca. There is a saying that you cannot breastfeed from your stepmother when your mother is still alive.

Whatever the cost, Kinyarwanda should become part of a popular culture and a dominant force in every public sphere in the country.

Butare

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