FROM THE EDITOR: Let's give language experts a chance

Dear readers, Margaret Mead, an American author once said: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." That is why Rwanda's language experts should not be crucified for proposing some changes to Kinyarwanda because they could be right. Naturally, it is not easy to give away what you have owned for years and it is understandable when most people resist any alterations to the language that has been spoken for centuries.

Dear readers,

Margaret Mead, an American author once said: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” That is why Rwanda’s language experts should not be crucified for proposing some changes to Kinyarwanda because they could be right. Naturally, it is not easy to give away what you have owned for years and it is understandable when most people resist any alterations to the language that has been spoken for centuries.

But why then do we send our children to school if not to discover and lead us where we might have gone wrong? How come we rarely question the wisdom of medical doctors even when they are tampering with long held practices? Does speaking Kinyarwanda necessarily make you an expert at it? What’s the way forward? Read our lead story to understand what these modifications mean to the education sector and how government plans to implement these proposals.

In “Know Your History”, we explain the origin of royal drums in Rwanda and the value attached to each type of drum. We have also lined up many other interesting reads in “Open Voice” and “Teachers Forum.”

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