Security Council presses for arrest of remaining Genocide fugitives

The UN security council on Saturday urged all states to cooperate with the ICTR, the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals and the Government of Rwanda in the arrest and prosecution of the remaining nine ICTR-indicted fugitives.

The UN security council on Saturday urged all states to cooperate with the ICTR, the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals and the Government of Rwanda in the arrest and prosecution of the remaining nine ICTR-indicted fugitives.

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Interahamwe militias run alongside a French military jeep during routine drills in 1994. Some of their leaders are still at large. (Internet photo)

On the 20th anniversary of International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), members of the Security Council, among others, emphasized that the establishment of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals pursuant to resolution 1966 (2010) was essential to ensure that the closure of the ICTR does not leave the door open to impunity for the remaining fugitives and for those whose appeals not yet complete.

“Further call upon states to investigate, arrest, prosecute or extradite, in accordance with applicable international obligations, all other fugitives accused of genocide residing on their territories,” read a press statement.

Nine at large

As the ICTR winds down its work, nine high profile fugitives suspected for playing critical roles in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda remain at large. They are Felicien Kabuga,

Augustin Bizimana, Protais Mpiranya, Fulgence Kayishema, Charles Sikubwabo, Ladislas Ntaganzwa, Pheneas Munyarugarama, Aloys Ndimbati and another only known as Ryandikayo.

The US government has staked $5 million for information leading to their arrest.

Once apprehended, three will be tried by the Mechanism for International Tribunals, a residual institution set to continue the work of the ICTR. Most of the fugitives are believed to be hiding in African countries.

Rwanda has already sent 244 international arrest warrants, indictments and extradition requests to 30 countries worldwide, with 106 of them sent to African countries, including Uganda, DR Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, Kenya, Gabon, Congo Brazzaville, South Africa, Central African Republic, Swaziland, Ivory Coast, Ghana and Zimbabwe.

However, only neighboring Uganda has extradited two suspects to Rwanda.

North American and European countries, including Canada, the USA, Norway, Sweden and Denmark, also, either extradited or deported some suspects. Others like Germany, France, Finland, The Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and Belgium have tried genocide cases in their own courts.

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