EALA bickering is a diversion from real issues

Editor, Allow me to react to the article, "New twist in EALA bickering" (The New Times, October 24). It's interesting that the MPs "have vowed not to proceed with work until the issue of alleged misconduct by one of their own is resolved."
EALA members in the plenary hall after house business was adjourned last week.(John Mbanda)
EALA members in the plenary hall after house business was adjourned last week.(John Mbanda)

Editor,

Allow me to react to the article, “New twist in EALA bickering” (The New Times, October 24).
It’s interesting that the MPs “have vowed not to proceed with work until the issue of alleged misconduct by one of their own is resolved.”

It raises a number of important issues to do with the “principles and procedures of fairness” that demand that the issue should be put to the disciplinary committee, investigated and substantiated before the accused MP is given the opportunity to defend herself.

If the issue is not resolved in the committee, it can then be referred  to the ordinary session.

Also interesting is that the MPs seem to be advancing the alleged insults to Presidents to give weight to the case. I mean, the offices of the respective Presidents should have formally complained if they felt offended.

In light of the above procedural issues, let me hope that the MPs, who are spending taxpayers’ money in expensive hotels, are not adjourning sessions to extend their stay to get more perdiem!

Zamu Isma

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What the MPs are doing is very unhonourable to say the least. I believe there are channels and procedures to address any misconduct of members. Suspending sessions is not one of them. What example are the honourables setting for other institutions especially college students? It is like if a lecturer misbehaves, boycott lectures until he is disciplined.

Gerald

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