Sex education: Do you discuss sex issues with your parents?

Recently, The Education Times visited IPAK Kimihura to find out whether these teenagers ever discuss sex-related matters with their parents. Solomon Asaba shares with us some of their testimonies

Recently, The Education Times visited IPAK Kimihura to find out whether these teenagers ever discuss sex-related matters with their parents. Solomon Asaba shares with us some of their testimonies

Benitha Twembi

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Benitha Twembi

I do not discuss anything to do with sex with my parents unless it is a totally different problem. If I have a boy who is disturbing me I discuss that with my friends. Usually most of them have already been educated about sexual behaviour by their parents.

Lilian Mutoni

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Lilian Mutoni

When I first started experiencing changes in my body, I always turned to my mother for help. Initially I used to hide some things from her but she some how always got to know. Now I’m used to her and confide in her a lot.

Esther Ngabire

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Esther Ngabire

Although my mother is very approachable, I find it difficult to discuss sex issues with her. I always find it easier to discuss such sensitive issues with my sister. But my sister has so far been very helpful so I’m not complaining.

Cynthia Sinamenye

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Cynthia Sinamenye

My parent is a curious type whom you can’t easily hide anything from. Even when you are in any sort of relationship he will find out. Although I would like to share my experience with them, I sometimes I feel shy and just keep quiet.

Victoire Bahati

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Victoire Bahati

Discussing issues of sex with any one is very difficult for me. In fact when such scenes come up in movies on television I cover my eyes or move away. May be things will change when I’m bigger.

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Sex education for children: 8 tips for parents

1. Think about how you were taught about sex as a child. Ask yourself if you want your child to have the same or a different experience.
2. Give age-appropriate answers. This means explaining things in a way that your child can understand given their age. There is no need to answer questions they haven’t asked. 3. Try to keep the exchange as a dialogue. When kids ask questions about sex, gently throw questions back at them. Find out what they know already and where they heard it from. This way, you can correct any misinformation from the start. Dialogue slows conversation down, giving you time to think, and lets you have a better idea when to stop.

4. Be honest. Children can often figure out when parents are not telling them the truth. If this happens, children are less likely to be receptive in the future.

5. Read. There are great, age-appropriate books about sex and reproduction for both parents and kids. Reading also helps get over any embarrassment.

6. If your child hasn’t asked about sex, start the conversation. Some kids are just naturally shy and don’t tend to ask a lot of questions about anything. Do not wait. Initiate a conversation with the child about sex. Ask them what they know and what is being taught at school.

7. Keep your cool. Get ready for the fact that sex talk will come up at badly timed moments, like in a bank line-up, and at full volume. Do not feel you have to answer, but rather say “great question, let’s talk about that in the car.”

8. Remember sex education is a continuing process. Kids will need some things repeated so as to understand. Keep talking.

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