The inhumane mask behind a BBC journalist

Her mouth is filled with lethal venom, a sting she uses through her camera lenses to propagate her hate for President Kagame. Her name is Jane Corbin, the producer of the BBC documentary "Rwanda, the Untold Story."

Her mouth is filled with lethal venom, a sting she uses through her camera lenses to propagate her hate for President Kagame. Her name is Jane Corbin, the producer of the BBC documentary “Rwanda, the Untold Story.”

Like I do for every movie or article, I watched the film with nervous anticipation. She sets the tone of the movie upfront… “Hollywood dramatised the Rwandan genocide.” The certitude, if not ignorance of her words made me shiver.

This documentary is not a provocation; it is a poke in the eye – Corbin is attacking all Rwandans. In case you have not watched the film, she is testing the hypothesis that Kagame ordered the shoot-down of the jet that was carrying President Habyarimana in April 1994.

Corbin concludes that the plane crush was the trigger of the Genocide and for sixty minutes she assaults President Kagame as the man who caused the Genocide. All her references on Rwanda were based on political defectors, such as Kayumba Nyamwasa, who lives in South Africa, and Théogene Rudasingwa in Washington DC.

The documentary also features devoted haters of the Rwandan government like Phillip Reyntjens, famously known for his political love affair with Habyarimana’s administration. Worse yet, Corbin supported her hypothesis with professor Allan Stam from Michigan University, who insanely claims that only 200,000 Tutsi died in the Genocide!

I have no shadow of doubt that Corbin is waging a war against Paul Kagame.  But this is a battle he should not fight alone – Rwandans in particular and those who value humanity should spearhead this fight of moral betrayal.

The absurdity of this film is how the BBC went classic and used Corbin for “covering for collectivism.” As was in early 1930’s Walter Duranty, reporting in Moscow was used by the New York Times to report for political gains while denying the deaths of over one million Ukrainians.

In the 21st Century you would not expect a powerhouse like the BBC to give a platform to a one-sided and conspicuous fashion of reporting. At the very least you would think the BBC, next door to Germany with the horrors of Jewish Holocaust, would be considerate of the Genocide against the Tutsi for the sake and respect of humanity.   

During the walk to remember for the 20th commemoration, Jane Corbin walked among the crowd, only if anyone knew a devil was lurking behind and ready to strike. She is genetically coded to hate Paul Kagame. The absence of sympathy to mummified bodies and silent bones defines her true character.

Although the BBC used Corbin to her satisfaction, this is no different from RTLM propaganda. For Corbin this film it is a homerun – for the BBC I am not sure what to say.

Tom Hammerschmidt once wrote: “Grief demands an answer but sometimes there isn’t one.” Millions of Rwandans are left with questions unanswered. Genocide survivors are slapped in the face and are expected to sleep a wink. The BBC is not only undermining the human tragedy but also denying the progress Rwanda has made in unifying the country.

This documentary exemplifies how western organisations prove too powerful beyond borders to belittle foreign nations.  Unfortunately, this western arrogance is a reality small economies, especially Africa, have to deal with in a globalised world.

One of standing principles of International Relations holds; attack on one means attack on all. If at all Africa is united, you would expect a reaction from member states but, thus far, it has been very minimal.

Personally, I think when events like this go without a response prove that Africa is twig every bird can land on.

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