Revisit policy of demolishing illegal buildings

Editor, Refer to the story, "Authorities close down multimillion city church" (The New Times, October 4). In the story, it was reported that "According to the law, any structure built without a permit is razed down and a fine imposed on the owner."

Editor,

Refer tothe story, “Authorities close down multimillion city church” (The New Times, October 4). In the story, it was reported that “According to the law, any structure built without a permit is razed down and a fine imposed on the owner.”

I think that Rwanda, as a poor country in the poorest continent, should not rush to take such destructive measures. Whenever something ‘illegal’ is put up, it appears the only thing that authorities think of is demolition and fining — no one seem to consider finding a lasting solution without ruining the little we have.

I don’t condone doing things illegally, but I don’t at all understand how such a big building was put up, day and night, with local authorities apparently aware of that (because there’s no way such a huge church should be up without their consent), only for you to come with bulldozers and raze the building down upon completion or several months later!

We have to see things differently if we really wish to attain the dreams of Vision 2020. Instead of rushing to punish the taxpayer (this time church owners and members), they should first ask local leaders to resign because they are doing nothing. They are the ones who should bear the prime consequences because they played a role in what would befall that church (you can call it a business).

Whatever authorities will do, don’t tell me that they are going to implement their insane decision and dare raze down that multi-million edifice. We Africans are poor, and all we have to think of is flourishing what we sweated to build, instead of demolishing them.

Mutara Intore

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