MPs commit to expedite legislative procedures

One-year into the parliamentary five-year term, the Lower Chamber of Deputies has recommitted itself to expedite the legislative process.
Members of Parliament attend a session earlier this month. (Timothy Kisambira)
Members of Parliament attend a session earlier this month. (Timothy Kisambira)

One-year into the parliamentary five-year term, the Lower Chamber of Deputies has recommitted itself to expedite the legislative process.

Briefing journalists on activities of the first year of parliament mandate, Speaker Donatile Mukabalisa yesterday said Parliament is working hard to ensure that bills enacted are made operational three months after being passed.

“Parliament has realised that implementation of some laws is delayed by ministerial enforcement orders. We have come up with a list of all laws that were published in the Official Gazette but have not been implemented pending ministerial orders,” Mukabalisa said, adding that they have already  got a recommendation from the Prime Minister’s office.

The Speaker’s remarks follow reports that some laws passed by Parliament have not been operational pending ministerial orders.

For example the law establishing medical professional insurance which was passed and published in the Official Gazette two years ago has not been operational due to delayed ministerial order, according to sources. 

“When the three months elapse, we shall task  stakeholders to explain the delays,” she added.

Since October 2013, when the Lower Chamber was sworn in, it has received 60 bills of which 54 were scrutinised and 41 of them passed and published in the Official Gazette, representing 95 per cent of performance execution by the legislature.

“This has been a busy year. Many reports, bills have been presented before us. We are delighted with the businesses we have executed and  hope to do better in the following years,” added Mukabalisa.

Meanwhile, Jean D’Arc Uwimanimpaye, the Deputy Speaker dismissed claims that lawmakers rarely visit villages to address grassroots issues.

“We do field visits twice every month, where we go to villages, attend village council meetings and engage local leaders on various leadership and community initiatives,” she said. 

 She said they would continue to do their routine visits to various localities in a bid to promote accountable and participatory leadership.

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