Know Your History: Mulindi where RPF did most of the planning during the struggle

Have you ever been to Mulindi, also known as "Umulindi w'Intwari' before? If so, did you know that this hill in the current Mulindi sector, Gicumbi district in the Northern Province was RPF's main commanding base during the 1990-1994 liberation struggle? It is for that reason that the Government decided to build a national museum on this hill to remind people about those heroic sacrifices.

Have you ever been to Mulindi, also known as “Umulindi w’Intwari’ before? If so, did you know that this hill in the current Mulindi sector, Gicumbi district in the Northern Province was RPF’s main commanding base during the 1990-1994 liberation struggle? It is for that reason that the Government decided to build a national museum on this hill to remind people about those heroic sacrifices.

At Mulindi, you will find President Paul Kagame’s bunker where he sat and planned the war. On the same hill is also a local tea factory and a number of buildings that were used for different purposes during the liberation war. For instance the store house for food and ammunitions is still existent. There is also a house known as Arusha, where a delegation of RPF Inkotanyi that engaged in negotiations with the then government of Rwanda first met to plan how to approach the dialogue. A group of 600 soldiers that were sent to Kigali to protect the politicians who were set to become members of the transitional government as per the Arusha Accords in 1993 also departed from Mulindi.

Also interesting to note is that at Mulindi there are football and volley ball pitches plus a tennis court which means that despite the heavy fighting, the liberators always created some time to relax.

Some sources even say that the idea to start a football team ( APR FC) was also born here. APR is run and financed by the Rwanda Defense Forces.

In order to capture all these memories, the Government is constructing a museum in this place.

“The museum that will bring together all these memories will promote culture and tourism while also challenging Rwandans to be more patriotic,” says Jerome Karangwa, director of research in the Institute of National Museum which run the museum.

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