It is important to discuss with the child and parent

Naturally no one likes being told that they have failed, even when they know it. Having to repeat a class is something that is often about one’s failure to meet what is considered to be the standard marks to go to the next class.
 Allan Brian Ssenyonga
Allan Brian Ssenyonga

Naturally no one likes being told that they have failed, even when they know it. Having to repeat a class is something that is often about one’s failure to meet what is considered to be the standard marks to go to the next class.

This is something quite significant since our education system is largely based on how a child can memorise what is asked during the examinations. Therefore, there is always a struggle towards examination time with many not just studying to pass but to escape the call to repeat a class.

Repeating therefore comes with a lot of psychological baggage for the child and many educators are not comfortable with it often looking for alternatives. Since the introduction of free education, repeating has been discouraged since with the huge numbers it creates a huge strain on the government’s side.

However there are sometimes when it is in the child’s best interest to repeat a class. If this is the case then, it is important not to pass the information to the child as if it was a death sentence. It would be much better if the child and the parent were called for a small meeting where the child gets to know what exactly happened and what steps maybe taken.

Let the child say whether repeating from a different school would be a better solution for his self esteem and whether he clearly understands that he/she needs to work harder in the coming year.

It is always good to involve parents and students in such decisions rather than just throwing them at the already depressed student. Also give the student a chance to briefly explain why they think their performance was not up to the required standard. You could be shocked by the revelations.

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