Acidity in the mouth spoils the teeth

Mouth acidity, caused by sugary foods, fizzy drinks and other acidic food items, can damage the teeth by softening their roots, a study by leading oral hygiene brand Pepsodent said.

Mouth acidity, caused by sugary foods, fizzy drinks and other acidic food items, can damage the teeth by softening their roots, a study by leading oral hygiene brand Pepsodent said.

“Acidity is not just something that occurs in the stomach during digestion; it begins in the mouth and causes the teeth to soften. Even a healthy diet can cause acid formation in the mouth and help the growth of harmful bacteria,” said the report.

“High acid level can wear away tooth enamel by damaging ‘pH’ level in teeth which refers to the balance between acids and alkaline elements in the body.  The Lower the pH level, the higher the acid in the mouth which makes teeth more sensitive to extreme temperatures and prone to decay,” it added.

While sugary foods, fizzy drinks and certain fruits increase the acid level in the mouth, consumption of bananas, potatoes, dairy products, especially milk and nuts along with a lot of water, help raise the pH levels and lower the acid level.

“After a meal, the pH level in mouth reduces for around two hours and saliva tries to neutralise the acid and raise the pH level, but if you continue to drink acidic beverages and sugary foods, the saliva will not be able to neutralise the acid,” it said.

Dentists say oral hygiene can be achieved by balanced meals, reducing refined carbohydrates intake and drinking water after every meal. Brushing twice daily up to four minutes using fluoride toothpaste will help keep the enamel of your teeth and maintain your overall oral health.

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