Beat the myths about diaper rash

Just how do you get it right with diapers? It is estimated that about one in three babies suffer from diaper rash, with many experiencing serious complications caused by bacterial or fungal infections. Some people claim diaper rash can only occur when you leave a baby wearing it for too long. Others blames it on fake pampers, while others still, will make claims that bode on the superstitious..

Just how do you get it right with diapers? It is estimated that about one in three babies suffer from diaper rash, with many experiencing serious complications caused by bacterial or fungal infections. Some people claim diaper rash can only occur when you leave a baby wearing it for too long. Others blames it on fake pampers, while others still, will make claims that bode on the superstitious..

A diaper rash is an area of inflamed skin in the diaper area in especially infants and young children. It is usually caused by skin irritation from prolonged contact with urine and faeces. Most babies will have diapers rash at some point in their life. What matters then is the severity of the rash of the subsequent infections.

However, because of the many complaints, traditionalists often succeed in convincing young mothers about the ‘dangers’ of diapers. To such school of thoughts, only using nappies work.

Diapers can lead to two different types of disease: an infection or an allergy.

When your baby suffers from painful skin rash and fever, it is urinal infection. A urinal infection can be bent forward by appropriately using the diapers consisting in changing them whenever the diaper is wet or soiled or at least every two or three hours during the day and at least two times a night. An infection should be treated with zinc oxide or medicaments like the Mikosyl Crème. During the period of urinal infection, the baby must not wear diapers. There is no problem using the same type of diapers after total convalescence.

But you should change the type of diapers you use for your baby when the skin rash is about an allergy. Allergies are recognised by red skin but no pain or fever. After having changed the type of diapers in case of allergy, there should not be any further skin rash.

The Rwanda Bureau of Standards maintains that all diaper products on the market are certified for consumers, so there are no fake pampers in the country. However, this does not mean you should sit back and relax your guard. Even drinking clean water can harm you if you do not drink it well. Proper use of diapers is recommended.

Some of the common misconceptions, according to the web site, parents.com, include;

Baby powder use

Myth: Sprinkle baby powder on your newborn after you change him.

Reality: There is no need to use powder on your baby’s skin.

“Diaper technology has come a long way, and diapers nowadays are very good at keeping babies dry. Baby powder, especially talc, has a great risk of inhalation and can cause respiratory problems,” the web site says.

Changing baby’s diaper

Myth: Never leave an infant in a wet or soiled diaper for more than 20 minutes.

Reality: It’s best to change diapers as soon as they’re wet or soiled, but there is no 20-minute rule.

“Kids are more likely to soil their diapers when they are awake than when they’re asleep, but if your baby does wet his diaper while sleeping, you do not need to wake him up to change his diaper. In general, if your baby is awake, for comfort reasons, rash prevention, and to minimise smell, it is best to change his diaper as soon as possible.”

Baby’s bowel movements

Myth: A baby or child who doesn’t have a bowel movement (BM) every day is likely to be constipated.

Reality: A baby or child can have a BM after each meal or go for days without one and still be “normal.”

“When it comes to their baby’s bowel movements, parents might get used to a certain frequency and get concerned when that pattern changes. Mom and Dad just need to remember that regular doesn’t have to be frequent. As long as there isn’t any difficulty passing them, there generally isn’t great cause to worry.”

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