Ras Omy-K turns to therapy music

He started off doing Afro-Beat music, but soon, he searched further for his true identity, venturing into Reggae and Dancehall. Ras Omy-K is currently in studio, putting together his maiden Reggae-Dancehall album. Already, tracks like Africa, Jah, and Ruka are enjoying fair rotation on local airwaves and in clubs. His next project, as he told Moses Opobo, is therapy music …

He started off doing Afro-Beat music, but soon, he searched further for his true identity, venturing into Reggae and Dancehall. Ras Omy-K is currently in studio, putting together his maiden Reggae-Dancehall album. Already, tracks like Africa, Jah, and Ruka are enjoying fair rotation on local airwaves and in clubs. His next project, as he told Moses Opobo, is therapy music …

Tell us about your latest studio project

 

It’s a Reggae-dancehall album whose title track, Africa is already doing well among local reggae lovers. In Africa, I’m simply asking the question; why do we fight amongst each other, yet we are of same blood? Why is there hunger in Darfur and Somalia, war in DR Congo, and orphans in Rwanda?

 

I’m shooting the videos for Africa, Ruka and Jah, all at once. Jah (God) is basically about people who hide in God’s name to propagate evil, like prosperity pastors. I did the whole album at Hope Studio with producer Jay P.

 

You are flying out of the country soon. Why, and where to?

I will be travelling to the United States of America before the end of this year, mainly for study purposes. However, it’s also my new home since it’s where my new family is based (he recently got married to an American girlfriend).

For the first two years, I will concentrate on studies. I plan to trace the African community there to make a bridge with Rwandans and Africans at home. Hopefully, I will organise a few concerts featuring Rwandan artistes.

More importantly, I want to study therapy music, which is basically about counseling people that suffer psychological trauma using music. After the course, I want to start an organisation to connect my homeland, Rwanda with the world. Many people have a lot of trauma, which can be diffused through music, either by listening to music, or creating a melody.

But I need help as it’s something I can’t do alone. My father-in-law is a skilled guitarist from who I intend to learn a lot, and bring it back here and teach it to young people. After discussing it with my wife, we agreed that it is here in Africa that we need the service most, as there is a lot of violence and suffering in Africa, for which music is the best medicine.

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