Can your CV land you the job?

You would imagine that after three or four years at an institution of higher learning pursuing a degree or diploma, employers would come looking for you eager for you to join them. But  few things are as imagined, you not only have to apply for the position you would like to hold, you also have to ensure that your resume is attractive and paints you in the best light possible.

You would imagine that after three or four years at an institution of higher learning pursuing a degree or diploma, employers would come looking for you eager for you to join them. But  few things are as imagined, you not only have to apply for the position you would like to hold, you also have to ensure that your resume is attractive and paints you in the best light possible.

As most employers will explain, several applicants may be qualified for the position but only those who’s CVs can capture the human resource officer’s attention stand the chance.

Jean Bosco Rwelinyange who heads the Human Resource Department at Cogebanque who has been receiving CVs for the last 23 years explains that being the document to market you to the employers it should be detailed leaving no questions about your ability.

“It is in a CV that you can find a summary of the  job seeker’s information that would be required to ascertain that he/she is qualified for a the job. It is supposed to show your background, and abilities. The first thing on your CV should be general identification, after that you should give your academic qualifications in detail starting from the lowest to the highest.

At university level you have to give more details on courses or specialisations you took if you held positions while in a higher institute of learning you should indicate them too. Then after that comes your professional background; here you detail different posts that you have held explaining main tasks performed at each post and other skills that you have that could be relevant to this position, fresh graduates can put in their internships as professional experience.”

Rwelinyange goes further to explain to explain that curriculum vitae should be simple without exaggerated designs or decorations. “Let what is contained in the document speak for itself. Avoid the temptation to over design or decorate it. Just highlight what you consider important. “

“The length of the CV should be determined by the applicant’s experience, one who has been working previously will obviously have a longer one compared to a fresh graduate. Referees are an important component of the CV that most people leave out. These should be people who can be contacted for more information about you or can be contacted to ascertain that what you have indicated is true. Most applications will request that you put at least three persons. Make sure that you include trust worthy people and inform them that you have mentioned them,” Rwelinyange says.

Most job applicants use the same Curriculum vitae for numerous job applications something which recruitment expert strongly discourage. “You should tailor make your CV according to the Terms of Reference of the job as it was advertised. By doing this, it is easy for the employers to go through it and determine if one you are qualified,” adds Rwelinyange

Kaneza Innocent, an employer and Managing Director of Esicia Ltd, an IT solutions firm, says he mostly looks for the professional experience the applicant has, “it is good to make sure that your professional experience is clear because it helps the employer be sure that you can handle the task.”

Kaneza encourages applicants to be modest or else they might end up making a mistake most applicants do leaving the employer with the wrong impression, “once in a while you come across a resume where the applicant indicates that he is good at almost everything which rarely adds up. If you indicate that you are good at almost everything, the employer may get an impression that you are only trying to impress them, be precise on your strong areas.”

Gloria Uwera who runs her family’s businesses amongst them a bookshop and distributing agency is an employer in her one right and once in a while handles job applications. Uwera says most of the resumes received have too much irrelevant information that could distract the employer. “Make it short but detailed; when you are brief the employer will want to take a second look or know more about you. Long ones lose the reader in the middle. By making it very long, the employer can already tell that you are trying hard to impress.”

Being your first introduction and impression to your soon to be bosses, make sure your resume makes them want to find out more about you. 

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