The long holiday is not for idling around

The life of a teacher is largely one that follows a routine. You get up very early in the morning, dress up and then head to class. Several hours are then spent mainly standing in front of class labouring to pass on knowledge and skills to young impressionable minds.

The life of a teacher is largely one that follows a routine. You get up very early in the morning, dress up and then head to class. Several hours are then spent mainly standing in front of class labouring to pass on knowledge and skills to young impressionable minds.

At the end of the day one goes home but remains in their teaching mode as more often than not you have to mark scripts, or exercises that were given during a lesson and almost every day you are expected to plan for the next day’s teaching.

On many occasions a teacher not on duty may find themselves at school or called to school for one reason or another. Basically speaking, teaching is one of the few professions that is not just done but lived. Students are often encouraged to ask their teachers almost anything and anywhere. It is a full time calling.

This week Education Times shines a torch on what really happens when students break off for the long holiday at the end of the year. During this time, the students are excited about the break and you are bound to see different articles in papers advising them on how to constructively spend their time. Little attention is paid to the teachers.

Well the teachers too love this moment as they get to slow down from the hectic schedules. I call it slowing down because many use the time to offer their expertise in form of private tuition while others go for short courses.

This is not a time for idling and drinking yourself silly. Use it to freshen up or earn some little money to supplement your pay but make sure you are in better shape before the new term begins. Enjoy your holidays.

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