Always consult in case of doubt or suspicion

Last Friday, most schools around the country broke off for their third term holiday. As expected, parents expect to receive a report card detailing the performance of their child while at school. Education Times saw it timely to address the mysteries that surround a report card.
Allan Brian Ssenyonga
Allan Brian Ssenyonga

Last Friday, most schools around the country broke off for their third term holiday. As expected, parents expect to receive a report card detailing the performance of their child while at school. Education Times saw it timely to address the mysteries that surround a report card.

Just like any transaction one is likely to demand a receipt or certificate, basically documentation to ascertain what has just transpired. Now with education parents pay tuition fees for their children who are expected to attend class where teachers are teaching. Once this whole process has come to an end, an examination or test may be conducted as a form of evaluation.

A report card, therefore, is a summary of what your child has been up to while at school. Remember that children spend more time at school than at home and so this document ought to be handled with utmost seriousness.

However, there are cases where you may doubt the authenticity of your child’s report card or simply have trouble with what may appear to be discrepancies. In any such situation the wise thing to do is to get in touch with the school authorities to get clarity on this issue.

Do not be too quick to trust your child, it is 2013 and many children are smarter than you were during your school days. Any doubt or suspicion should be investigated. If you do not take a report card seriously, then it means your child’s education is not of any importance to you, something that would be quite unfortunate.

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