Ugandan teachers threaten to boycott marking exams

Teachers in Uganda have threatened not to mark Uganda National Examinations Board exams, days after they agreed to suspend their strike over pay rise.

Teachers in Uganda have threatened not to mark Uganda National Examinations Board exams, days after they agreed to suspend their strike over pay rise.

Through their umbrella organisation, Uganda National Teachers’ Union (Unatu), the civil servants maintain that they will resume their strike on November 10 if nothing materialises from a committee which government set up last week.

James Tweheyo, the Unatu general-secretary, said the teachers are justified to be angry and requested that they should be patient with the committee to discuss the options that were tabled before the government.

“Even those who are angry will understand why some things have to be done the way they are. The government will have had all its time to think through their positions. We do not want anybody to think that we have been inconsiderate,” Tweheyo said.

“Pupils will have completed Primary Leaving Examinations. We are the ones who mark. I want to assure you that PLE will not be marked if this is not worked on. The government should not take chances,” he added.

He said they had given the government 28 days to reach an agreement.

The Unatu chief also said that although the final document they signed with the government to draw them back to class did not have the details of their discussion; they are contained in the meeting minutes.

He also warned that if the strike is resumed, it would affect Senior Four and Six candidates who will be midway through their Uganda Certificate of Education and Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education exams, respectively.

“We did not want to cause an unnecessary anxiety among parents. This was to show them that we are concerned and want the best for our children’s future,” Tweheyo said.

On the claims that some Unatu officials were bribed, Tweheyo said: “It is not true that we have received money from the government. We rejected their food. How then can we accept money? They are trying to make us dirty but we will remain focused. All these are intended to divert us. Our cause is genuine and we must pursue it to the end.'

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