Curiosity: Sometimes a parent’s worst fear

It is a joy to watch your kids grow into young adults. Many parents spend little time with their children and in the end; most of what they learn comes from school or their caretakers. Children are the best philosophers, so they say. They ask a lot of questions because they want to know everything.

It is a joy to watch your kids grow into young adults. Many parents spend little time with their children and in the end; most of what they learn comes from school or their caretakers. Children are the best philosophers, so they say. They ask a lot of questions because they want to know everything.

When it comes to some questions, many parents out there do not know how to approach them. Questions like; where do babies come from or why do people die or what do certain words mean are tricky to answer. Some decide to lie or dodge the question altogether. So, the child opts for alternatives which might either be their friends, the internet, or TV.

 

Most of these questions are awkward and embarrassing and come at the worst time! If your 11-year-old asks you if you have ever cheated on their daddy because he heard some people talk about it, better be careful with your response because in the end, what we say to them shapes who they really become.

 

“We can all become parents but some do not know how to be a parent!  Every age comes with its questions, but all it takes is a parent who talks to their children and knows them well,” said Harriet Kobusingye, a mother of two.

 

According to Lazarus Ocira, a specialist in child protection, create a foundation for communicating with your children and give them opportunities to ask questions. “Try to be as honest as possible and figure out why they are asking such questions. Your children will gain trust in you and you will always be the first they run to if they need an answer,” he says.

He adds, “Communication is the core of parental engagement. You need to be able to talk with your children about difficult issues, including substance abuse, violence, and sex to get them to talk to you honestly about what’s going on in their lives, and to guide them to make healthy, sensible decisions.”

You need to establish the lines of communication well beforehand by encouraging conversation when your child is younger. Conversation is also a give-and-take operation. Make sure that you are receiving (listening) as much as you are giving (talking). Sometimes an open mind and an open ear are the best things you can bring to a conversation with your child.

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