Do the parties realise that the 2010 campaign is upon us?

With barely a year left for the people to go to polls it is becoming common to find political talk dominating many discussions. Rwandans, who last went to the polls late last year voting for the representatives in the national legislative assembly, will next year, decide on which party or individual will carry the mantle of the top office.

With barely a year left for the people to go to polls it is becoming common to find political talk dominating many discussions.

Rwandans, who last went to the polls late last year voting for the representatives in the national legislative assembly, will next year, decide on which party or individual will carry the mantle of the top office.

The RPF, with its current leader and President Rwanda Paul Kagame, according to my observation and from what I personally have heard from other people in most of the joints in and around Kigali have taken a longer stride, in terms of mobilisation, for 2010 elections if compared to the other political parties.

Actually, in my opinion, there is little political activity from the other political organisations. In fact, most of these political parties do not exist on the ground.

Much still needs to be done in terms mobilization, especially of the youth that have of recent reached voting age.

All parties need a vibrant youth league capable of making young people feel that they, too, are a part of the political process.

Without doubt, all of them must be aware of the role of the Youth League of the African National Congress played in the concluded South African presidential and parliamentary elections, which was held about 100 days ago.

A strong youth league, modelled on the ANC’s, is very paramount for any political party wishing to enjoy political success.

These political parties need to build stronger political structures right from the grass root to their national assemblies; otherwise most of them will remain “brief case” parties.

2010 is around the corner and for a party to favourably compete with an incumbent political party like RPF, which won not less than 95% of the cast votes last time, much ground work is necessary.

And this should have been done earlier than 2009. This unserious-ness suggests a comfortable win for the incumbent party that has made long strides in uplifting the socio- economic welfare of the people of Rwanda.

I am not being a prophet of doom, for the opposition parties, I am only attempting to wake up those fellows who seem not to care about the need for mobilisation for the 2010 campaign.                                                                                            
phatari@yahoo.co.uk

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