Youth commemorating the Genocide

It’s a week since the official launch of the 17th Commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. We continue to be strong against the grief of our loved ones we lost during the Genocide.A lot of confessions have crossed our minds and ears, survivors have told their stories, some of the Genocide perpetrators and killers have come to justice, while others are shielded in Western capitals.

It’s a week since the official launch of the 17th Commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. We continue to be strong against the grief of our loved ones we lost during the Genocide.

A lot of confessions have crossed our minds and ears, survivors have told their stories, some of the Genocide perpetrators and killers have come to justice, while others are shielded in Western capitals.

Rwanda’s musicians have expressed sympathy through songs and poems so that we can remember and forge a way forward. I can say we have established hope for ourselves as Rwandans as we rebuild our country.

A lot of commemoration deeds like “Walk to Remember” have already laid ground for the commemoration exercise to go on. More so we persist to mourn for our loved ones.

The times we are in have created the foundation to lay this exercise as an effective way if our country is going to survive tomorrow. Rwanda’s youth are at the forefront.

For a better Rwanda, the youths must uphold the systems that prevail today. Exemplary deeds like commemorating the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi and many other commemoration activities need to be alive even for many more years. As our President Paul Kagame says we shall continue to Commemorate the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi even the 100th time!

When we commemorate the Genocide we remember the loved ones we lost. Not only do we remember but we also give hope to the country by saying, “Never Again.” We do not say Never Again for the sake of feeling at home in society but it is equivalent to paying respect to the ones that left us at the hands of ruthless killers.

Additionally, remembering our lost ones, we totally exterminate the thought of the enemies who still think such evil as Genocide will happen again. The youths today needs to know the difference between a friend and the enemy. That way we can be sure our dear Rwanda is in dear hands.

Furthermore teenagers, need to remember the horrendous acts that were committed against our loved ones and be able to reconcile and live together in harmony as one people feeding from the same cord which is our motherland.

I was stunned by the large numbers of people that turned out at “Walk to Remember” exercise on Saturday April 9, 2011. These youth are symbolic of a country that has hope and a vision.

The touching speeches often characterised with a message of hope that have been spoken by different dignitaries challenge us the youths to keep this hope alive through working together to rebuild our country.

Therefore I urge Rwanda’s youth to stay encouraged and be willing to accelerate the country strategy for a better and incredible Rwanda. “Never Again” and “Better youth better Rwanda”.  

rutarindwabob@yahoo.co.uk

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