Editorial: Private sector needs to invest in water industry

Rwanda is blessed with regular and abundant rainfall but it has not yet mastered the art of water harvesting and conservation.

In the next three years, dry taps will be history, especially in Kigali where some neighborhoods only get water three or four days in a week.

There have been many promises in the past that the water shortage would end “soon” but has never been fulfilled. Now Water and Sanitation Corporation (WASAC) in charge of water supply says it could have found a lasting solution and there is reason to believe that this time the “soon” will be now.

WASAC has announced a very ambitious project after inking an agreement with the African Development Bank for a $300 million funding to be invested in upgrading the water supply infrastructure that will see not only more water storage and supply facilities, but an extra 1.1 million people will be connected to clean water.

Rwanda is blessed with regular and abundant rainfall but it has not yet mastered the art of water harvesting and conservation. Most of the rain water goes to waste a situation that has to change as a matter of priority.

Another area that needs a complete overhaul is the mindset that water supply is the responsibility of the state. The private sector needs to get out of its comfort zone and enter the water fray. It is an area that could turn into a gold mine since water will never cease to be in demand.

Already a young lady in the Eastern Province is a step ahead supplying her neighborhood with clean water instead of them walking miles to the nearest clean water source. And it all began with a simple idea of purifying river water and digging boreholes.

All it needed was just thinking outside the box. So, why can’t those with access to much more resources ease WASC’s burden so that more people get clean water?

editorial@newtimes.co.rw