EDITORIAL: Abuses or whatever; getting justice for survivors is what matters

The Dutch authorities have announced the opening of investigations into another Genocide suspect hiding in that country. If all goes well, 63-year-old Jean Baptiste Nyabusore will soon be on the same flight path of as Claude Iyamuremye and Jean Baptiste Mugimba. Both were extradited by Dutch authorities in November 2016.

Bringing to justice those behind the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi is a slow, tedious and sometimes very frustrating affair. Countries harbouring Genocide suspects have been slow to react and only a handful have been extradited or put on trial in their host countries.

What has come out clearly in the past two-decades-and-a-half in the quest for justice; lots of strange fellows joined the train along the way and some for obscure reasons akin to psychological imbalance.

It seems denying the Genocide is contagious; many who have joined a clique of well-known Genocide deniers have been contaminated by rabid hate of the RPF, Rwanda’s leadership as well as survivors.

Most of the defence lawyers in Arusha are of the breed, they never hide which side they are on and many were clearly married to their clients’ cause and ideologies.

Incidentally, Nyabusore’s lawyer is the same one who unsuccessfully defended the previous deportees, Mugimba and Iyamuremye. Caroline Buisman is not interested in the legal well-being of her clients; she is only interested in going on stage to spew out her hatred.

To show just how low she is not afraid to stoop, in one of her court appearances, she said Genocide commemoration activities in the Netherlands were “platforms for political manipulations”. She cannot get any lower.

The consolation in all that is that her insults will not break survivors’ bones, and as long as they get justice, Buisman and her ilk will forever be knocking on a resilient brick wall.