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30 RIB officers complete course on investigation

Participants underwent investigation techniques, including crime scene handling, interview and interrogation skills, statement recording, and collection of evidence.
Graduation of professional investigators course at the National Police College in Musanze. / Courtesy

Twenty-nine Rwanda Investigation Bureau (RIB) officers have successfully completed a six-month professional criminal investigation course that equipped them with skills to successfully carry out their responsibilities.

The course, that ended yesterday, took place at the National Police College in Musanze District.

 

Participants underwent investigation techniques, including crime scene handling, interview and interrogation skills, statement recording, and collection of evidence.

 

According to officials, other courses included case filing compilation, human rights in criminal investigation, and professional ethics.

 

The courses were facilitated by instructors from RIB, National Police College, University of Rwanda, Rwanda Bar Association and forensic laboratory,  among others.

The College Commandant, Commissioner of Police (CP), Felix Namuhoranye, said the trainees acquired enough practical skills for them to perform better and expressed optimism that the course had made them career investigators.

Col Jeannot Ruhunga, the Secretary General of RIB, hailed the college for its role in producing qualified officers.

He said there was need to change the way investigations are carried out, given the emerging ways through which crimes are committed.

“The current trends require well trained investigators equipped with adequate skills to investigate emerging crimes such cyber-crimes, drug trafficking, among others; you have been trained to deliver professionally, efficiently and effectively,” Col Ruhunga told the investigators.

He urged those who completed training to uphold ethics and put the acquired skills to good use by investigating cases professionally and supporting the justice sector by striving to make sure they bring positive changes that the country expects from them.

“The change that we are talking about is a positive change, the quality of the file, the quality of the investigations should change and should be seen to be changed otherwise it would be a loss for the government to put up an institution that will not make any change, or have any impact.” Col Ruhunga cautioned.

Ruhunga promised more capacity building programmes for the graduates, assuring continuous trainings in partnership with a wing of criminal investigations department from National Police College.

Ildephonse Ndanguzi, one of the participants, said he had acquired practical skills in criminal investigation that would help him investigate cases professionally to help render justice.

“I have learnt how to relate an incident that has occurred with what the law says, by what we call ‘facts’, therefore, this will help me to produce quality and clear dossiers,” he said.

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