IPRC students unveil innovations to mark World Science Day

Emmanuel Tuyizere, level one student in automobile technology at IPRC Karongi, who in 2018 developed a 'Green Vehicle System'. / Jean Dieu Nsabimana

Rwanda Friday marked World Science Day at IPRC-Gishari in Rwamagana District.

The day was marked under the theme: “Science for peace and development: open science, leaving no one behind."

Various projects of young innovators studying in IPRC colleges from around the country were showcased, which impressed and gained applause of the leaders and general public.

The State Minister for Primary and Secondary Education at Ministry of Education, Isaac Munyakazi, said other countries that achieved technological advancement in all sectors, “are people like us."

He added that those countries started with things "like our own young men and young women have showcased here today, if they can do it, why not us? That is science.

“Most of the innovations are giving us solutions in agriculture, technology, and some have even gone in fighting crimes. We are pleased because it is being done".

A group of officials led by Minister of State for Primary and Secondary Education Isaac Munyakazi (M) tour stands showcasing different innovations of students studying in IPRCs from across the country. / Jean Dieu Nsabimana

As a nation targeting to have a knowledge-based economy, Munyakazi said it was their responsibility to keep improving education, and there is a government plan to prioritise and strengthen STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) discipline.

Innovations

Israel Niyonshuti a 24-year-old student in electronics and electrical engineering at IPRC Kigali exhibited a "Smart Student Card", an electronic card that gives both student and school administration information generated by the system.

“A student can know if they are registered, we have an android-based application you download, when you download it you log in and place your card on the phone, which tell you whether or not you are registered, the class you are in, your marks, it can also tell you about your attendance," he explained.

The 24-year-old Israel Niyonshuti, student in electronics and electrical engineering at IPRC Kigali showcases the 'Smart Student Card' system that has been working in the school for more than two years.

One can even know whether they have a problem with the finance department, rate their lecturer and give detailed student's information to the teacher.

Emmanuel Tuyizere, a level one student in automobile technology at IPRC Karongi, since 2018 developed the "Green Vehicle System", aimed at controlling a car’s pollution levels. It first warns the driver before it stops the automobile.

“I thought this after learning that Rwanda is concerned by reducing air pollution, and the cars are part of air polluters, especially in urban areas.

My aim is to have an air free of the pollution from automobiles and my technology promises to contribute," he explained.

All to do with science

Projected Habyarimana, physics teacher at IPRC Kigali, was demonstrating how Newton’s laws of physics is a foundation of all innovations; back from simple machines.

Projected Habyarimana, physics teacher at IPRC Kigali, demonstrating Newton's laws in physics. He said science used in a positive way changes lives for better.

The role of sciences is to make life easier, he reminded.

“I would like to encourage youth to study harder, and to love science,” said Olivier Kamana, Head of Applied Research and Development and Foresight Incubation Department at National Industrial Research and Development Agency (NIRDA).

"Science is not integral they teach in mathematics, bonding in chemistry, it is not just what you see there, you have to think beyond, to think what happens after that science you see, as you study mathematics, biology and chemistry, behind, there are medicines, gas leakage detector [technologies in a car], among others”.

Olivier Kamana, Head of Applied Research and Development and Foresight Incubation Department at National Industrial Research and Development Agency (NIRDA).

"I challenge you to start dreaming of one project, an invention that you can come up with,” he told the students, adding that his institution welcomes and supports scientific research and innovations.

Figures from the Ministry of Education show that 58.7 per cent of students in upper secondary are doing STEM related subjects.

World Science Day has been globally celebrated every year since 2002, and in Rwanda since 2009, to improve access to STEM for sustainable development, and raising awareness on the role of science, technology and innovation in education sector and the community.

One of the exhibitors at World Science Day had created an online crime reporting system.

editor@newtimesrwanda.com