Let’s use technology to facilitate learning

An instructor helps a student during a computer class. / File photo
Teaching and learning are two different variables that have been evolving over the years. New techniques have been invented to improve both components.

It is in light of this that technology has emerged and is steadily holding a tight grip on the education system. This has surprisingly made teachers unconsciously fail in their professional engagements.

As much as I appreciate the role of technology and economic development, I believe it has, in this case, greatly affected a vital aspect in learning, which is the student-teacher relationship.

Writing this article, I recalled several scenarios as a student where a lecturer would come in and teach for a few minutes then instruct us to purchase notes from photocopiers.

Teaching goes beyond conveying information and knowledge, this is why facilitated learning should go beyond systems, facts, figures and, it certainly should not exist to promote narrowness and lack of social interaction.

Teachers are trained to nurture students into responsible citizens. As a zealous advocate for the teaching profession and a teacher for that matter, I believe it is important that curriculum developers and other policy makers find ways of harnessing these fundamental differences and make the emerging technology demand relevant to learning and teaching.

Our goal as teachers is to fundamentally encourage independent thinking, inquiry and learning.

It is dangerous if the models of learning in the future require students to spend hours in front of computer screens, exposed to largely unfettered material in an essentially risky environment.

Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle once said, “Man is a political animal”, central to that idea was mankind’s innate desire to interact and learn from one another.

Teaching and learning is multifaceted, it is entirely based on trust and acquaintance that is shaped between the teacher and students. It stages a convenient atmosphere that makes learning happen in a smooth manner.

Teachers do not simply teach concepts and skills, technology can do that as well but they inspire young people to be lifelong learners, creating a culture of independent inquiry with their enthusiasm and passion. I know this because I see it every day. Good teachers have the skills to know exactly how to get the best out of each and every young person in their care.

As a teacher, my passion is driven by the need to have an impact on my students. Teachers are meant to do more than just teaching, they should establish a strong bond with their students if they are to make a remarkable impact in their lives.

 

editorial@newtimes..co.rw