The New Times to publish a Genocide commemoration special edition

The New Times will tomorrow (Monday) publish a special pullout in commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The pullout, an insert in the newspaper, is an in-depth and reflective publication about the Genocide. It is detailing events that led to the Genocide, what transpired and the aftermath.

The New Times will tomorrow (Monday) publish a special pullout in commemoration of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The pullout, an insert in the newspaper, is an in-depth and reflective publication about the Genocide. It is detailing events that led to the Genocide, what transpired and the aftermath.

But most important the pullout highlights steps the country has taken over the last 20 years to rebuild a society whose fabric was torn to pieces by one of the worst mass killings in modern day history, leaving one million people dead.

The Kwibuka20 special pullout will have well researched articles on the Genocide and expert opinions on the way forward for Rwandans as they remember and reflect on the tragedy that befell the nation.  

It is a special package that reflects on the 20 years since the Genocide and how the country has rebuilt since.

For the next 100 days we shall also be publishing stories of resilience, reconciliation and the recovery journey.

A series of events were organised in the run-up to the 20th commemoration of the Genocide .

Three months in the lead-up to April 7, Rwandans began national mourning of the victims for the 20th time through a series of activities both within Rwanda and in the Diaspora.

The centre of attention was the symbolic countrywide tour of a flame of remembrance, dubbed “Kwibuka Flame.”

It was lit at the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre in Gisozi on January 7 and was taken on a lap of honour through the country’s 30 districts.

During the tour of the torch, every Rwandan was given a chance to get involved in thinking about the Genocide history and what they can do to move forward together.

The torch is a symbol of the Rwandan spirit of unity and hope which are seen as key to the reconstruction of Rwanda from scratches since the Genocide.

 

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