Genocide survivor shares experience with Liberians

Immaculee Ilibagiza, a survivor and author on the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi, was yesterday scheduled to share her reconciliatory experience with the people of Liberia.

Immaculee Ilibagiza, a survivor and author on the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi, was yesterday scheduled to share her reconciliatory experience with the people of Liberia.

When Genocide started in 1994, Immaculee Ilibagiza was a teen mechanical engineering student at the National University of Rwanda and she spent 91 days hidden in a pastor’s cramped bathroom together with a group of other women.

NewLiberian.com reported early this week that during her week-long visit in the country, the recipient of several notable international accolades will share her story, experience and motivation for survival with Liberians.

“It is hoped that by sharing her story, Liberians will be further strengthened to deal with their post conflict effects and promote healing and recovery among victims of the conflict,” read part of the statement.

Described as one of one of the world’s leading speakers on peace, faith and forgiveness, Ilibagiza is a host of a documentary titled: “Ready to Forgive, An African Story of Grace,” a project sponsored by The Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. She is also the author of the memoir titled ‘Left To Tell’ a book that has been praised by many people around the world.

“Everyone should read this story-survivors as well as perpetrators,” wrote Rwanda’s First Lady Jeannette Kagame in the book. Her family was brutally murdered during a three-month killing spree that claimed over a million lives.

Liberia is Africa’s oldest republic, but it became better known in the 1990s for its long-running, ruinous civil war and its role in a rebellion in neighbouring Sierra Leone.

Although founded by freed American and Caribbean slaves, Liberia is mostly made up of indigenous Africans, with the slaves’ descendants comprising 5% of the population.

The West African nation was relatively calm until 1980 when William Tolbert was overthrown by Sergeant Samuel Doe after food price riots.

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