Genocide survivor fears for her life

GASABO- With the passing of time, genocide-related issues have taken a new twist. Now, a genocide survivor resident of  Kamatamu Cell in Kacyiru, Gasabo District has revealed an attempt on her life in order to cover up evidence concerning the death of her husband during  the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.
Happy days-Devotha Mukamuligo’s murdered son Frederick Murasira. (Courtsey photo)
Happy days-Devotha Mukamuligo’s murdered son Frederick Murasira. (Courtsey photo)

GASABO- With the passing of time, genocide-related issues have taken a new twist. Now, a genocide survivor resident of  Kamatamu Cell in Kacyiru, Gasabo District has revealed an attempt on her life in order to cover up evidence concerning the death of her husband during  the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

In a revealing exclusive interview given to The NewTimes on Tuesday, Devotha Mukamuligo pinned one, Jean de Dieu Niyonsenga for having tried to run over her with a car on April, 25, 2009 near her home in Kacyiru.

The driver, Niyonsenga is according to Mukamuligo among those she suspects to have killed her husband, Appolinaire Rurangirwa.

“According to the information I have, these people are contemplating eliminating me,” Mukamuligo alleges.
After the hit-and-run car incident, Niyonsenga was arrested by police and detained. Days after, he was arraigned before the Kacyiru Lower Instance Court.

In court, Niyonsenga pleaded not guilty, saying the accident was not premeditated.

The court released him on May 12, citing lack of evidence to sustain the case against Niyonsenga. There was uproar when the court released Niyonsenga.

The prosecutor, Eugene Sakindi immediately contested the ruling and lodged an appeal.

“We didn’t agree with the ruling. This is what I can say at this stage,” Sakindi said by phone yesterday.

Scovia Ingabire, the Executive Secretary of Kacyiru Sector described Niyonsenga’s release as “shocking”.

“When the incident occurred, all security leaders in the area rushed to the scene. It was clear, according to eyewitness that Niyonsenga wanted to kill Mukamuligo,” Ingabire told The New Times in an interview on Wednesday.

Ingabire said: “But you know very well that the court always has the last word and we have to respect it.”

Mukamuligo maintains that the plot to kill her arose out of her refusal to implicate one Athanase Sekamana, a genocide suspect now in jail.

According to Mukamuligo her former neighbour, Jacques Ndirima had in the past told her that Sekamana killed her husband during the genocide.

After the genocide, Mukamuligo occupied one of Sekamana’s houses but later vacated it after finding out from other survivors that it was Ndirima together with other genocide suspects who killed her husband.

It is said that Sekamana knows Ndirima’s dark past and the latter fears that once the former is released; he might reveal his role in the genocide and end up in jail.

“Niyonsenga fears that I might testify against Ndirima,” Mukamuligo explained. Ndirima is married to Niyonsenga’s sister.

Mukamuligo’s incident comes two years after genocide suspects hacked to death her son Frederick Murasira.

Murasira was murdered on November 19, 2006 while riding a motorcycle in Mugatwa, in the Eastern Province.

Police spokesperson, John Uwamungu said on Thursday evening that the force would meet Mukamuligo to address her security concerns.

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