Consultant calls for Children’s Commission, Parliament

KIGALI - A consultant contracted to carry out a feasibility study regarding the integration of children into the process of national peace building, has suggested that a National Commission for Children and a Children’s Parliament be instituted.
NURC Executive Secretary Fatuma Ndangiza.
NURC Executive Secretary Fatuma Ndangiza.

KIGALI - A consultant contracted to carry out a feasibility study regarding the integration of children into the process of national peace building, has suggested that a National Commission for Children and a Children’s Parliament be instituted.

Aggee Shyaka made the suggestion yesterday, while presenting his findings during an event organised by the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission (NURC) which also saw the institution unveil a strategic plan on how children can be integrated in the national peace building process.

During the presentation, the consultant suggested that the two bodies would go a long way in the process of integrating the vulnerable group into the commission’s strategic plan.

“Apart from this, institutional capacity building, awareness at all levels country-wide, financial and material assistance to ensure today’s life and hope for a better tomorrow is also important,” Shyaka said.

The strategic framework will identify the role of children and address various needs of the vulnerable future generation most of whom are orphans of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

At the same event, Fatuma Ndangiza, the Executive Secretary of the NURC pointed out that children deserve a voice to express grievances and participate in activities that would help them acquire knowledge and learn from new experiences.

She highlighted the importance of building trust and confidence in the future leaders by recognising their contributions and giving them a sense of family and belonging.

“Children have for a long time suffered the worst forms of violence and reversing this requires collective responsibility by stakeholders. Educate them and involve them in possibly all decisions that affect society,” Ndangiza appealed.

She revealed that in conjunction with the Ministry of Education, NURC had recommended a module to create awareness about the country’s history, present progress and future prospects to keep the children focused.

She also advocated for civic trainings commonly known as Ingando in addition to forming interaction clubs that would regularly bring together the children through sports and entertainment.

“Previously Ingando were for older people but given their impact on society, children should be no exception in these important trainings that instil a culture of togetherness,” Ndangiza said.

Ends

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment