Kitoko: determined to keep going

As the troubled superstar announces plans to release yet another track, his music career seems to be on a downward slide, following the lingering allegations against his hit track Ikiragi, (damn).
Kitoko doing his thing.
Kitoko doing his thing.

As the troubled superstar announces plans to release yet another track, his music career seems to be on a downward slide, following the lingering allegations against his hit track Ikiragi, (damn).

The song Ikiragi, by True Eyez Production, was recently banned from featuring on the local radio stations, because of its controversial lyrics.

The 24-year-old star looked finished last weekend when he arrived at The New Times’ headquarters, distressed by the continued negative claims.

So, yeah I’m being bold here. It may seem a paradox to say that no musician is currently as famous as Kitoko is. Yes, some of you know because of his noisy Ikiragi saga, but many others of us know him as a talented singer, whose vocal cord has dominated the local music scene.

Despite of the prevailing allegations, Kitoko has gained prominence in Rwanda’s music industry. In fact, he is painted as Rwanda’s true Afro-beat star.

His compositions are often played on parties, nightclubs, and in many other happening places. And some of his other tracks like Igendere and Manyobwa have even reached greater popularity.

Much attention has been devoted on him. But on the other hand, he has also been described and criticised by many people. He is popular even to his face, like his music, and handsome, too.

But his over exaggerated principles and seriousness might send a wrong impression that he is arrogant. To get to him, one must have a sense of sophistication, and intellectual soberness. In short, one must first understand his artistic work.

That is the worst part of it, because, traditionally most Rwandans lag behind when it comes to Afro-beat music maestros. Also, so often, people claim that they understand Kitoko’s lyrics, but a very little portion.

It is not always realised how depth and complication may exist into a true music world. That is the first problem, because we tend to interpret their lyrics into our own inartistic understanding, thus misinterpreting the whole concept. 

Critics of this kind do not think favourably of Kitoko’s dramatic and descriptive symphonies. So, how can we encourage our upcoming talented musicians, instead of suppressing them?

In a country like Rwanda, where music is still at its infancy, timidity is great in the presence of a strong, but only half understood singer.

Actually, I think Kitoko might have also obtained consideration from lovers of classical music in Rwanda, because of the traditional dance (Amaraba). And the video was shot from at the national museum.

Dancers dressed in the Rwandan traditional wear (Imishanana). If listened attentively, the song Ikiragi, talks of how the former fell in love with a damn girl, and asked her to marry him and be a mother to his children. He also goes further to flatter her in his chorus that she is a flower and that has the best body structure…

True, some of our artists take music too far, and sometimes loose track. But, since we are their consumers, we can always guide them on what we want, but not feed on their loathsome lyrics.

Who has not met any of these artists? They will assure you with solid complacence how far they have gone into music, and how famous they are both locally and beyond boarders. They are not always true, but trying to be.

Meanwhile, artists should know that music is meant to send comforting message that heals broken hearts, and the melody that entertains people, but not as a tool used for provocation.

Ends

 

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