Unwanted pregnancies: Legislation is not panacea

Editor,  REFER TO Sunny Ntayombya’s article, “How many more women have to die before we say enough is enough?” (The New Times, April 30).

Editor, 

REFER TO Sunny Ntayombya’s article, “How many more women have to die before we say enough is enough?” (The New Times, April 30).

This shows hypocrisy. We always say we Rwandans must face our problems and get solutions, but there’s hypocrisy in our social life.

I agree that our kids need to know the physiology of their bodies, especially once they join Primary One. But that isn’t the right time to talk o them about reproduction and abortion. They are too young to understand it. 

We should instead teach them the basics of biology and task them to do more research for themselves. Let them be aware of their physiology and the rest will be introduced to them gradually once they attain a certain developmental stage.

Peter, Rwanda

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WE SHOULD avoid mixing things. Sexual education does not prevent unintended pregnancies. 

Do you think that in countries with strong sex education, women do not get unintended pregnancies? The problem here is abortion. With sexual education or not, you can get unintended pregnancy, 

So the solution is to think twice before laying on that bed. 

My advice: if you remember that God is watching you and that the guy is not your husband, so you will escape the trap.

Azatwarabe, West Bank, Palestine

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WHY ISN’T bad experience informative enough for our young girls? We should understand that legislation is not a panacea. 

While we await legislators to do their job, please mobilise our young people to open their eyes and give their life a meaning. Advocate for condom use in period of uncertainty about one’s fertility.

Jean-Marie, Rwanda

 

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