Don’t let South Sudan go down the drain

Editor,  REFERENCE IS made to the article, “Rwandans call for intervention in South Sudan as unrest continues” (The New Times, April 24). 
The conflict in South Sudan has displaced thousands of civilians and killed many others. Net photo.
The conflict in South Sudan has displaced thousands of civilians and killed many others. Net photo.

Editor, 

REFERENCE IS made to the article, “Rwandans call for intervention in South Sudan as unrest continues” (The New Times, April 24). 

Absolutely; atrocities taking place in South Sudan must come to an end, and the international community – through the African Union and the United Nations – should position itself as an effective arbitrator, entitled to use force whenever necessary to protect civilians. 

This situation in South Sudan might not be as complex as it sounds, even if it involves two leaders from two different tribes (in the African context, one would automatically think tribal issue). But these two leaders had been working together for years on end, before splitting up last year.

Yes, South Sudanese groups have fought each other along tribal lines – and still do – but this particular situation sounds more like a power issue, than the inability to live together. The danger is of course that a tough fight for power turns into full-blown tribal hatred. 

Irrespective of the above, the attack recently carried out in a camp under UN protection by individuals under disguise (...seriously?), is indicative of the chaos and inefficiencies on the ground. They cannot be a warning call to the international community. 

For those of us who rooted for the South Sudan Liberation Army in the mid-1980s and 1990s against the oppression from the North, today’s state of affairs in the region is simply heartbreaking.

Diyana, Rwanda

 

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