New tech to help cut survey costs

Government could save up to eight per cent of the money spent on conducting project survey, thanks to the new Arial topography survey system by Akagera aviation and Ecartip, a French based group.
An aerial view of River Nyabarongo. /’ Akagera  Aviation Photo
An aerial view of River Nyabarongo. /’ Akagera Aviation Photo

Government could save up to eight per cent of the money spent on conducting project survey, thanks to the new Arial topography survey system by Akagera aviation and Ecartip, a French based group.

The new Lidar and Camera technology, seeks to provide aerial topographic survey services which will enable   sectors to achieve highly accurate topographic data combined with high-resolution aerial photography and orthoimagery thereby reducing on operational costs.

Unlike traditional topographic survey, where only 50 metres is covered on average per day,   the 3D Atlas lasergrammetry image model  is able to cover over 100 kilometers per day  saving up to eight per cent in real costs, Henri Patou, Aerial survey expert, Ecartip group said during a workshop in Kigali.

“Our aerial survey services will provide the topographic and visual information required to improve decision-making while reducing costs, saving time and improving safety with our Helicopter the Agusta 109, Patrick Nkulikiyimfura, managing director Akagera Aviation said while presenting the technology to stake holders on Thursday.

“We know that we cannot achieve Vision 2020 without embracing technology and sharing our expertise with other sectors of the economy. 

“We are very confident that with this technology, a lot of time will be saved,” Nkulikiyimfura said.

Sectors that could benefit from the high tech Arial topography survey system will include linear projects (railway, pipeline and road projects), power line projects (EWSA, dam projects and real estate projects) among others.

He also encouraged government institutions, including the ministries of Infrastructure and Natural Resources, environment watchdogs and those in risk and disaster management to embrace the new technology so as to promote efficiency and accuracy in delivery of services.

The technology could also be used in survey stakeout, polygonales measurements, cubes calculations, preliminary design, platforms and road conception including hydraulic dimension, axes optimisation, 3D Models.

Jean Paul Niyibizi, a technician and transport expert at the Ministry of Infrastructure, said the technology will not only help the ministry in terms of cost reduction but also data collection and storage.

“The technology is timely and will enable the ministry achieve its objectives. Using traditional means of conducting surveys normally wastes time and leaves room for inaccurate data. However with introduction of 3D Ariel survey technology, our work will be streamlined further,” Niyibizi told this paper.

 

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