We can do without house-helps

Editor, One person’s evil actions shouldn’t extrapolate to the whole country. Even in countries where death penalty is applicable, there are still psychopaths within societies.

Editor,

I SHARE my sincere condolences with the bereaved family of little Shalom Isimbi Uwase (Bella) (see Sunny Ntayombya's article: After little Bella’s death, should we rethink the death penalty?, The New Times, April 2, 2014).

One person’s evil actions shouldn’t extrapolate to the whole country. Even in countries where death penalty is applicable, there are still psychopaths within societies.

My advice is that we should refrain from hiring house-helpers and learn to do all the house work by ourselves.

It’s time we thought about how we get along with this new lifestyle – living in precaution – and I think it’s worth it. If the husband and wife are working, they can live children in daycare schools and then pick them up in the evening while coming from work. At home, they will start cooking and preparing for the next day.

We should remember that no human being is going to eliminate crime from this world despite all the hanging, shooting platoons, electric chairs. That this happened in Rwanda doesn’t mean that things are all over worse to discuss change of laws.

Toni, Germany

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IT’S NOT easy to understand how a criminal like that can be kept alive, but do not let our anger lead to such a decision (reinstating the death penalty) – let’s look farther.

After the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, I heard prisoners brag how they killed innocent people; I almost went into coma.

Today, look at them in public correctional centres where they are contributing to the country’s development. They have become good citizens.

It’s now a good time to reflect: if evildoers pay with death, what shall we benefit? Can’t we offer them a chance to become humans again?

Mark, Rwanda

 

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