Regional police students learn post-Genocide transformation

Rev. Antoine Rutayisire of Remera Anglican Church in Kigali has challenged security organs on the African continent to be patriotic and stay focused to their mandates to ensure sustainable security in their respective countries.

Rev. Antoine Rutayisire of Remera Anglican Church in Kigali has challenged security organs on the African continent to be patriotic and stay focused to their mandates to ensure sustainable security in their respective countries.

He said the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi was inevitable because security organs of the then ruling regime had breached their mandate and instead aided in the planning and killing of fellow Rwandans.

Rutayisire made the remarks on Wednesday at Kigali memorial centre while responding to questions raised by Police students from regional countries attending the ‘Police Senior Command and Staff Course’ at the National Police College (NPC) in Musanze District.

A total of 22 police officers from nine regional countries are attending the course after which they will graduate with a Masters Degree in Peace Studies and Conflict Transformation.

They had visited the memorial centre as part of their studies and to also pay tribute to the Genocide victims.

“Genocide cannot happen unless the army and police are involved,” Rutayisire said.

He faulted international courts that have freed some officers responsible for the Genocide. The officers asked various questions related to Gacaca, the semi-traditional courts, among others.

Rev. Rutayisire said Rwanda has embarked on a transformation path through home-grown development initiatives such as Gacaca and Ndi Umunyarwanda, that have helped reconcile and unite Rwandans.

Gacaca judicial system was established in 2002 to speed up Genocide trials, establish the truth about the Genocide, fight impunity and help reconcile Rwandans.

“It is terrible to see people killing fellow citizens,” Supt. Ephantus Kariuki from Kenya, said.

 

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