Do beauty queens live up to expectations?

Editor, Allow me to respond to the article, “Beauty pageants: Are they crossing the red line on morality?” (The New Times, February 7).
Miss Rwanda beauty 2014 contestants in Rwamagana District, Eastern Province . File
Miss Rwanda beauty 2014 contestants in Rwamagana District, Eastern Province . File

Editor,

Allow me to respond to the article, “Beauty pageants: Are they crossing the red line on morality?” (The New Times, February 7).

Apostle Joshua Masasu made a crucial point that should not be taken lightly only that he presented it in Biblical perspective. Of course these girls are vulnerable to immorality: we only see their nakedness at the contest and if one of them goes an extra mile globally, it is simply bare.

My concern is that even the promoters cannot account for resources spent vis-à-vis the intended goal. If at all women empowerment is the main objective, then the concerned institutions should give an account based on cost-benefit analysis to disapprove Apostle’s view.

The costs of organising the event are much greater than empowering the girls. All contestants vow to promote and advocate for girls empowerment or orphans welfare, but ask them what they have achieved, if at all they are in Rwanda: advertising and travelling.

In fact, these events are more of a liability than an asset to the Rwandan Community.

Let me give you some assignment, trace back all the “Misses” and see how they have behaved in society and you will make your own conclusions. Thank You.

Emmanuel Mulisa, Rwanda

 

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