Kwibuka Flame should reignite Rwandans’ Never Again pledge

Editor, Genocide commemoration period is a therapy to those suffering and an opportunity to publicly bow/pay respect to the memory of the victims.
20-year-old youth carry the Kwibuka Flame. The flame is on a country wide tour. File.
20-year-old youth carry the Kwibuka Flame. The flame is on a country wide tour. File.

Editor,

Genocide commemoration period is a therapy to those suffering and an opportunity to publicly bow/pay respect to the memory of the victims.

Remembrance must play a therapeutic role to individuals and psychological role to society. Let the past be part of us.

Communication and information are the two important tools to fight genocide ideology.

Given the scope of the tragedy and its consequence, the objective of Genocide remembrance is and will always be timely. Rwandans need to remember the past and seek to give an explanation in the present and give meaning. With remembrance, we spare the present and the future generations the repetition of the evil committed in the past.

The ongoing 20th Genocide commemoration requires all Rwandans, particularly those in the political sphere, members of religious denominations, and the civil society as well as partners of Rwanda to have a moral duty and political commitment.

This is not about the summation of individual memories, but it’s a result of awareness – a model that strengthens the feelings of belonging towards the same identity. Rebuilding a country on the remembrance of Genocide is creating new conditions of existence, a new social contract in a bruised country on the necessary awareness of the fact that one part of the population attempted to physically wipe out another.

It is rebuilding social relationships distorted for decades, first by ethnic divisions, then ethno-political divisions. Let us not live by anger any more but rather live happily with zeal and passion if we are to build a bright future. For if we remember we get to know the whole truth. And if something is known, it can never be unknown but can only be forgotten.

History will tell us about the past and memory will connect the present and forge a future.

It is very important to educate the population, especially the youth to be rational, always aim at objectivity so as to acquire free conduct with a critical way of thinking.

Civic education on Genocide helps Rwandans understand the forces that undermined peace and egalitarianism in Rwanda, betrayed a generation of youthful Rwandans and later to the genocide forms – for these forces are still with us.

We need to educate our people to discover how their decisions make a meaningful difference in the community and a nation that Rwanda is.

David Nkusi, Rwanda

Reaction to the story, “Kwibuka Flame: Learning from the country’s past” (The New Times, February 4)

 

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