The American Dream: Some Rwandans have lived it

Editor,I would like to share my comments on Ingina y’Igihanga’s article, “When the American dream becomes a nightmare”, published in the Sunday Times on September 22.
Statue of Liberty. The New  Times / File.
Statue of Liberty. The New Times / File.

Editor,

I would like to share my comments on Ingina y’Igihanga’s article, “When the American dream becomes a nightmare”, published in the Sunday Times on September 22.

I absolutely disagree with the notion that the United States is a hell on earth. Some Rwandans have benefited from the US more than I can possibly explain here. We came to USA and we made gains like never before.

We have very successful Rwandans in various fields in USA and our contribution to our motherland is not negligible. USA is more than media headlines; it’s more than Jerry Springer show.

I don’t think that you really know the US to the point of warning people about it. I’m not disputing the nature or climate of violence, but I dispute the prism you use to analyse the United States.

Abdul Rahman Ntaganda, Kigali

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I think you misunderstood the moral in this piece. It isn’t so much that the US is hell on earth but that it ain’tEldorado either as many would-be migrants believe.

Many studies show in fact that contrary to the myth of rugged individualism and self-made men where anyone can achieve that American Dream, the USA is a very stratified society with much less mobility among those social strata than most OECD member states, including European countries assumed to be the most socially conscious.

Would-be migrants with dreams of an easy road to riches in developed countries should be disabused of this fantasy. They have as much chance of doing that as indeed winning the lotto.

Mwene Kalinda, Kigali, Rwanda

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I agree with MweneKalinda. I am an American citizen, fourth generation of an immigrant family from Québec. There are many Rwandans in our state (Maine) who are doing well (earning a living and contributing positively to our society).

I met a teacher who was born in Rwanda so,yes; it is possible to carve a niche for oneself here in the US. However, there are other Rwandans who are not teachers and do indeed struggle here.  Violence is everywhere, so is injustice, we all have to seek our inner peace, be grateful for what we have, but sometimes bad things happen that are not deserved.

Christine Boisvert
, Maine, United States

 

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