Corruption, a vice Rwanda will not embrace

Most African countries lose millions of revenue each year due to corruption, especially in the civil service. Public funds are often embezzled by civil servants with sticky fingers who lead lavish lifestyles at the mercy of citizens they are supposed to serve. Rwanda is a country that has not only preached a zero tolerance for one of the world’s oldest vices – corruption – but she has put into practice what she preaches. There are laws and regulations in place to combat corruption. The country has won accolades from various institutions of integrity for her anti-corruption drive. The Rwandan government continues to walk the talk. Today we report of the setting up of the Anti-Corruption Consultative Council, a body that brings together all key government departments that are involved in the fight against corruption.

Most African countries lose millions of revenue each year due to corruption, especially in the civil service. Public funds are often embezzled by civil servants with sticky fingers who lead lavish lifestyles at the mercy of citizens they are supposed to serve.

Rwanda is a country that has not only preached a zero tolerance for one of the world’s oldest vices – corruption – but she has put into practice what she preaches.

There are laws and regulations in place to combat corruption. The country has won accolades from various institutions of integrity for her anti-corruption drive.

The Rwandan government continues to walk the talk. Today we report of the setting up of the Anti-Corruption Consultative Council, a body that brings together all key government departments that are involved in the fight against corruption.

These include the Ombudsman’s office, Justice and Local Government Ministries, the Prosecutor General, the Police and the Deputy Chief Justice. Explaining the functions of the Council, the Ombudsman, Tito Rutaremara, said that it will operate from his office.

From there activities to deal with graft will be coordinated, in an open transparent manner, with the full involvement of the media, who will publicise research findings. This strengthens the institutional measures in place to deal with corruption.

This indeed is exemplary leadership, and those who might have been thinking of dipping their fingers into public coffers should be fore-warned.

On the hot topic of corruption, the Director General of the Central Public Investment and External Finance Bureau (CEPEX), was arrested for allegedly causing the loss of Rwf 453m in abuse of his office, which is responsible for the management of public investments.

This is not the only example of the government’s anti-corruption drive. Last week we reported on the net closing in on public servants who failed to declare their assets or could not explain the source of their wealth. 

Being a civil servant means being a servant of the people that means transparency in all public dealings.

Ends

 

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