NURC meets varsity student representatives

In an attempt to completely heal the impact of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsis, the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission (NURC) has met with student leaders of the Forum of Students’ Clubs for Unity and Reconciliation (SCUR).

In an attempt to completely heal the impact of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsis, the National Unity and Reconciliation Commission (NURC) has met with student leaders of the Forum of Students’ Clubs for Unity and Reconciliation (SCUR).

The clubs which are present in all universities and other institutions of higher learning, target the youth to sensitise them on unity and reconciliation alongside their social responsibilities.

After declaring the achievements registered last year, this year’s goals were made public and the students pondered on possible ways of making the targets come into reality.

“As University students, we know that our country expects much from us. We will be proud to provide our efforts in the reconstruction of the Rwandan society which had been torn apart by bad history,” Victor Innocent Mutimura, the chairperson of SCUR Forum said.

He observed that by including young people in important decision making, it would help change their mindset and give them a forum to have their opinions heard in the interest of the public.

On several occasions club members have visited TIG camps where  Genocide convicts who have confessed perform community service in lieu of imprisonment and the students have discussed reconciliation with them.

“We have helped most of them as they get reintegrated into society by enabling them to make decisions on how they can develop themselves in particular and the country in general,” Mutimura said.

Fatuma Ndangiza, the NURC Executive Secretary hailed the students’ body for the commitment towards transforming Rwanda into a united country where people strive for common national interests.

“We should challenge each other even more by organizing public debates and avoid being pushed into doing what we all know is wrong,” Ndangiza urged students.

“You need to be innovative and where your elders go wrong, never fear to correct them,” Ndangiza said.

Students’ Clubs for Unity and Reconciliation exist in over 15 public and private institutions of higher learning and are now being introduced in secondary schools and have been adopted by 500 schools countrywide.

Ends

 

Have Your SayLeave a comment