Police, Religious leaders meet

Police yesterday its headquarters in Kacyiru met with various religious leaders with the view of sharing and finding a way forward as far as the their activities and the law are concerned.
The Director of Community Policing, Chief Sup. Emmanuel Butera, talks to Bishop Augustine Mvunabandi of Kigeme Diocese and other religious leaders after the workshop. (Photo J.Mbanda).
The Director of Community Policing, Chief Sup. Emmanuel Butera, talks to Bishop Augustine Mvunabandi of Kigeme Diocese and other religious leaders after the workshop. (Photo J.Mbanda).

Police yesterday its headquarters in Kacyiru met with various religious leaders with the view of sharing and finding a way forward as far as the their activities and the law are concerned.

According to the Director of Community Policing, Chief Superintendent Emmanuel Butera, this meeting was primarily directed towards calling upon religious leaders in their different sects to do their work within the confines of the law, as opposed to carrying out their activities in a way that contradicts the law.

“Religious leaders should do their work in a manner that does not inconvenience or incite the public into wrong doing. Instead, they should practice their religion in a way that highlights and keeps people within the rule of law.” Underscored Butera, in an interview with The New Times.

He cited an example of some churches that have been reported to police for making a lot of noise, not minding the inconvenience they cause to residents within the vicinity.

During this meeting, religious leaders were also urged to cultivate the country’s cultures and good morals in the people, as opposed to fueling immorality and disorder.

“Religious leaders and the different religious houses ought to use their positions, of being trusted custodians of good values by the community, to reinforce good morals, culture and community order,” explained Butera.

The acting Commissioner General of Police, Mary Gahonzire raised a concern of some foreign religious leaders who, if not well screened before dealing with them, might cause social disorder, as some of them travel with hidden agendas that might ruin the image of religion.

She advised churches and visiting pastors to be transparent in the agendas of their visits and work towards contributing to public order other than disorder.

Reverend George Agaba from Foundations of Peace Church in Kabuga, during an exclusive interview with The New Times, said he was happy to be invited by police to discuss issues regarding the welfare and sanity of their community and country saying it was a prudent move.

“We are indeed privileged by this call to discuss issues that are so vital in our work, the welfare of the communities we live in and our country at large,” said Agaba.

He commended this undertaking saying that it gave them an opportunity to express their concerns and a chance to form a pool of ideas for the smooth running of God’s work, without compromising societal laws.

“This forum will help us evaluate ourselves and advise each other where we have gone wrong to avoid scandals such as serving for personal gains which taints the image of religion,” he observed.

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