Police networks to fight International criminals

GASABO - Twenty police officers from three African countries have been empowered to analyse criminal law and criminal activities at both local and international levels in order to collaboratively fight crimes worldwide, a police official has said.
Gatete.
Gatete.

GASABO - Twenty police officers from three African countries have been empowered to analyse criminal law and criminal activities at both local and international levels in order to collaboratively fight crimes worldwide, a police official has said.

Assistant Commissioner of Police and Director of Training, Cyprian Gatete, Thursday told The New Times that joint efforts are better than individual ones. 

This was at Hotel La Palisse after the official closing ceremony of a two-day training of officers from Tanzania, Rwanda and Liberia.

The International Criminal Police Organisation (Interpol) crime analysis training course was conducted under the organisation’s Oasis Africa programme.

“We can now network and fight crime because the world is now a small village and crimes move like wild fire (from one place to another). Sharing information would help us to work as a team,” Gatete explained.

He also told the participants that after the course, it will be easy for them to investigate and come up with good analytical reports which will help in making good decisions.

Trainees will be able to know where criminals get finances, their financers, how they are linked to their crimes, how they operate, why they commit crimes. 

He also explained that the training will help the Rwanda National Police (RNP) to effectively ensure the security of people.

Detective Constable Yakob Hassan Masoli from Tanzania said, “As someone working with Interpol Tanzania, the training will help me in my daily duties since there are many international crimes.”

Under Oasis Africa, Interpol is providing operational assistance, services and infrastructural support to African Police Forces. As policing and law enforcement enters into the 21st Century, new challenges arise.

International crimes and criminal activities broaden their scope and the need for operational support becomes crucial.

Programmes designed to provide countries with sophisticated, efficient crime-fighting tools and technology capable of enhancing the capacity of law enforcement agencies become imperative, Interpol noted. 

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