Sandra Karigirwa shines at the diva’s concert

You may be a woman but not all women are Diva’s. However, all women can be Diva’s if they want, because the diva is inbuilt. Once you feel like you have achieved glory in music, in one way or another, you automatically qualify to be a diva.

You may be a woman but not all women are Diva’s. However, all women can be Diva’s if they want, because the diva is inbuilt. Once you feel like you have achieved glory in music, in one way or another, you automatically qualify to be a diva.

That is why women who have the ‘diva’ within themselves came together at Kampala Serena Hotel to celebrate their achievements.

The highly rated show dubbed “Diva’s Unite” last weekend was a success story with corporate women coming together to dine and wine accompanied by orchestrated live music from Guest artists.

It’s on this glamorous evening that Sandra ‘Nyinawumuntu’ Karigirwa, the Ugandan based Rwandan Songstress stole the show.

Invited to perform as a Musician-cum-Human rights activist from Rwanda, Sandra and her troupe danced their way to peoples hearts, receiving a deafening applause from the crowd.

It was quite amazing to see people swaying their arms gracefully and rhythmically as she crooned out “Ndi Ishusho yaawe Rwanda”.

For a moment you could think everybody understood the words in the song which is sang in Kinyarwanda.

No wonder the MC of the night Uncle Mich Egwang fumbled with a few Kinyarwanda words, which I cannot figure out or write, trying to thank Sandra.

Smartly draped in ‘umushanana’, the popular Kinyarwnda Garb, Sandra didn’t disappoint any body, she sang her heart out, smiled through the performance.

All mothers sprung to their feet and clapped from start to the end like it was the anthem of the night. Her energetic dancers equally left the crowd begging for more.

Though Armani, the Kenyan Girl did not turn up, the show remained a success and Keefe; the Nigerian Songbird thrilled the crowd with her energetic queen dancers.

Halima Namakula, the organizer who celebrated her ten years in the music industry, left the crowd begging for more.

There was a fashion show and a talk show of sorts hosted by Dr. Jackie Kitulu from Kenya, to crown the night.

Sandra answered questions from Jackie whose questions required somebody to think fast and brightly or risk exposing your “dull” side to the audience.

Asked what makes her think she is a Human Rights activist, Sandra said that; the kind of work she’s involved in makes her one.She is a voice for the voiceless woman. She does this through her music.

The concert will be held in different African countries and December will be Kigali’s turn.

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