Grow mushrooms—Chinese expert

A Chinese agronomist is encouraging households in the country to grow mushroom to fight poverty and bolster food production. Lin Zhansen, an agronomist at Kabuye describes the mushrooms as a better crop suitable for Rwanda. They can grow on poor soils and produce high yields. It is estimated that at least 1.6 tonnes of mushrooms can be produced on 30 square metres land.
Mushrooms at Kabuye mushroom growing demonstration farm. ( Photo/E. Mucunguzi).
Mushrooms at Kabuye mushroom growing demonstration farm. ( Photo/E. Mucunguzi).

A Chinese agronomist is encouraging households in the country to grow mushroom to fight poverty and bolster food production. Lin Zhansen, an agronomist at Kabuye describes the mushrooms as a better crop suitable for Rwanda. They can grow on poor soils and produce high yields. It is estimated that at least 1.6 tonnes of mushrooms can be produced on 30 square metres land.

He cited Ninyxia, one of the Province in China as an area that had poor residents but mushroom growing has changed their lives.

“Because we are using the same technology, we target to turn Kabuye a mushroom industry and it’s possible, said Zhansen.

Why mushrooms

Information from Spore indicates that mushrooms can be cultivated in small spaces, and even inside houses. Their short growing cycle means that they can be harvested several times a year, thereby giving a greater and faster return than any other plant grown in the region.

Rwanda has started with 5 different varieties. The farm gate price of mushrooms on average is Frw1500, meaning, from each square metre, a farmer can earn Frw67, 500-every after 10 days.

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