Water utility to rein in on corrupt staff

Water and Sanitation Corporation (WASAC) has reiterated that any of its employees caught asking for payment for services delivered will be handed to courts of law.
Residents of Muhanga draw water. Timothy Kisambira
Residents of Muhanga draw water. Timothy Kisambira

Water and Sanitation Corporation (WASAC) has reiterated that any of its employees caught asking for payment for services delivered will be handed to courts of law.

Speaking to The New Times, WASAC’s commercial director Lucien Ruterana said the tough measures were initiated by the utility’s new management as part of boosting efficiency and service delivery.

The measures were first announced last week.

“Our staff are already aware that any corruption case will be punished not only by terminating the contract but also by bringing the case to the courts of law,” he said.

The new strategy comes on the heels of the recent sacking and arrest of former WASAC boss James Sano over corruption-related charges.

Aimé Muzola, the former director of planning at the Ministry of Infrastructure, replaced Sano.

Ruterana said WASAC is working with security organs and local authorities to ensure that no one pays for what is not prescribed in the utility’s manual.

“We are discussing and developing various strategies to identify employees who solicit money from clients. Customers and the general public should call anti-corruption authorities since they have staff with appropriate skills. We will continue an awareness programme until this malpractice stops,” he said.

Asked about the timing, Ruterana said the changes will continue with more resources being channelled into improving service delivery.

“For instance, every branch has vehicles to facilitate transport of staff in daily operations. Clients should not pay “transport” for our staff. This means that we will be serving clients on first-come-first-serve basis and each branch has to make sure that every client is served accordingly,” he said.

He cautioned clients to be keen on who they let into their homes.

“Our staff must always wear WASAC uniform or carry a badge. We have some cases where some people close or open valves in the water network, cau sing disruptions in the water distribution. Report such people to help ensure equitable distribution of water,” he said.

editorial@newtimes.co.rw

 

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