Make better decisions for our tertiary institutions in 2008

The education system has over the past 13 years scored major achievements, considering that the officials in charge inherited a system that was in shambles. However, this was not the only shattered sector, areas such as justice, the economy and others, all were in a very sorry state when the genocidal regime lost power in July 1994. And it is partly in consideration of the complex situation the country was in during that terrible period that thirteen years down the road many people highly recognise the tremendous achievements registered since then.

The education system has over the past 13 years scored major achievements, considering that the officials in charge inherited a system that was in shambles. However, this was not the only shattered sector, areas such as justice, the economy and others, all were in a very sorry state when the genocidal regime lost power in July 1994. And it is partly in consideration of the complex situation the country was in during that terrible period that thirteen years down the road many people highly recognise the tremendous achievements registered since then.

Student enrolment at all levels of education has significantly shot up, and the quality and relevance of education is by and large in line with the development the country needs. Most importantly though is that access to tertiary institutions have greatly increased, largely because the number of higher learning institutions has risen to over ten today from one thirteen years ago.

However, for many years now the education ministry has failed to manage the higher education system. At least seven universities, many of them over ten years old, remain unaccredited even though they continue to admit and send into the job market thousands of young Rwandans without awarding them valid academic transcripts.

The stalemate has in the end put students who have finished their studies at the affected universities at a disadvantage in the job market because they cannot produce required documents to employers.

 In the end, many are on the streets unemployed despite spending many years at ‘universities’.

The concerned education officials have for long been trying to advance all sorts of excuses and playing a blame game, for this regrettable situation, citing among others lacking standards of the institutions in question. However there remain many unanswered questions.

Why should a ‘substandard’ university/learning institution be left to open and run for years right under the nose of concerned authorities? What will be the fate of those that completed their education in those embattled universities? The education ministry should provide answers to these concerns now. In 2008, those indifferences should be sorted out.
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