Genocide trials: UK should learn from other countries

RE: “CNLG, Ibuka urge UK judiciary to respect Rwanda’s judicial system” (The New Times, July 30).
Dr Jean-Damascene Bizimana, the executive secretary of CNLG, speaks during a Genocide commemoration event in Kigali earlier this year. File
Dr Jean-Damascene Bizimana, the executive secretary of CNLG, speaks during a Genocide commemoration event in Kigali earlier this year. File

Editor,

RE: “CNLG, Ibuka urge UK judiciary to respect Rwanda’s judicial system” (The New Times, July 30).

The High Court of Justice of England and Wales should at least try the suspects if it doesn’t trust our fair and equitable justice. I hope the problem lies elsewhere and not the issue of getting fair justice. If the issue was about getting fair and impartial justice, the Court should borrow a leaf from other countries that extradited suspects to Rwanda—and it knows that those suspects have got a fair trial that meets international standards.

For instance, Canada deported Léon Mugesera; The Netherlands brought back Jean-Baptiste Mugimba and Jean-Claude Iyamuremye (notorious as Nzinga); USA returned Prof. Léopold Munyakazi, among others.

ICTR handed over Jean Uwinkindi, Ladislas Ntaganzwa, and Bernard Munyagishari.

I believe these countries and jurisdictions sent back these suspects because they trust the Rwandan justice. If the High Court of Justice of England and Wales does not want to encourage impunity, it should send investigators to Rwanda to gather information on the sites where the men are suspected to have committed the crimes and try them basing on facts from the crime scene, if they do not want to send them back home to account for their deeds.

Ruling out extradition of Genocide suspects is kind of giving them a safe haven, which should be avoided by every country, every people, and every society.

Bemba

 

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